Springfield City Council LIVE July 13, 2020

Welcome to tonight’s city council meeting! There’s some great zoning matters on tonight’s agenda!

City Council Meeting: City Council meets every other Monday at 6:30 pm in Historic City Hall, Springfield MO.

Posted by City of Springfield, MO – Connect with SGF on Monday, July 13, 2020

The Mayor calls the meeting to order at 6:33 p.m..

1. ROLL CALL.
2. APPROVAL OF MINUTES. JUNE 29, 2020 CITY COUNCIL MEETING AND JUNE 30, 2020 SPECIAL CITY COUNCIL MEETINGS.
Documents:

  1. 06-29-2020.PDF
  2. 06-30-20 SPECIAL CITY COUNCIL MEETING.PDF

3. FINALIZATION AND APPROVAL OF CONSENT AGENDAS. CITIZENS WISHING TO SPEAK TO OR REMOVE ITEMS FROM THE CONSENT AGENDAS MUST NOTIFY THE CITY CLERK BY 5:00 P.M. ON FRIDAY, JULY 10, 2020.

Council Bill 2020-171 is removed from the agenda.

Passes 9-0.

6. SECOND READING AND FINAL PASSAGE. Citizens Have Spoken. May Be Voted On.
7. Council Bill 2020-147 (Ollis)
A Special Ordinance approving the plans and specifications for the construction of Landfill Facility Improvement, Phases 1, 2, and 3, at the Noble Hill Sanitary Landfill; accepting the bid of Carson-Mitchell, Inc., in the amount of $5,016,632.00 for the project; authorizing the City Manager, or his designee, to enter into contracts necessary for completion of said Landfill Facility Improvements; and approving a budget adjustment for the amount of the bid, plus a contingency, to amend the budget for the Department of Environmental Services Solid Waste Fund for Fiscal Year 2020-2021 by appropriating reserves of said fund in the amount of $6,250,000.00.
Documents:

2020-147.PDF

Passes 9-0.

8. Council Bill 2020-148 (McGull)
A General Ordinance amending the Springfield City Code, Chapter 2, ‘Administration,’ Article VI, ‘Finances,’ Division 2, ‘Purchasing,’ Section 2-401, ‘Purchasing Manual adopted,’ by adding Section 13-3.104(5)(C) for the purpose of allowing the use of the “Construction Manager at Risk ” contracting processes.
Documents:

2020-148.PDF

Passes 9-0.

9. Council Bill 2020-149 (Simpson)
A Special Ordinance approving the plans and specifications for the Battlefield Road and Delaware Avenue Signal Replacement Project; accepting the bid of Ewing Signal Construction, LLC, in the amount of $125,773.33 for the project; and authorizing the City Manager, or his designee, to enter into a contract with such bidder.
Documents:

2020-149.PDF

Passes 9-0.

10. Council Bill 2020-150 (Hosmer)
A General Ordinance amending the Springfield City Code, Chapter 54, ‘Fire Prevention and Protection,’ Article II, ‘Fire Prevention Code,’ Section 54-32, ‘Amendments and additions,’ by adding specific local amendments to Section 320 of the 2018 International Fire Code, relating to Landscaping Materials.
Documents:

2020-150.PDF

Passes 9-0.

11. Council Bill 2020-153 (McGull)
A Special Ordinance approving the final development plan of Planned Development District No. 298, on 44.70 acres generally located at 3414 East Chestnut Expressway. (Planning and Zoning Commission and Staff recommend approval.)
Documents:

2020-153.PDF

Passes 9-0.

And now, we move into items where people are signed up to speak. Grab a tasty beverage, refresh your popcorn, and buckle your seat belt!

12. RESOLUTIONS. Citizens May Speak. May Be Voted On.
13. Council Bill 2020-157 (Lear)
A Resolution granting a new liquor license to sell retail liquor in the original package, including Sunday sales, to SKT, LLC, d/b/a AM PM Food Mart, for their location at 529-531 South Grant Avenue, Springfield, Missouri.
Documents:

2020-157.PDF

Councilman Hosmer wants the license rejected because we shouldn’t send a pro alcohol message to young people and the ordinance says no alcohol within 200 feet of a school so the ordinance should be enforced.

Councilman McGull asked if vagrancy is a problem at that location, staff could not answer. McGull agreed with Hosmer on the ordinance point.

Michelle Salicky speaks to Council. She is against the liquor license. She said she would avoid having to walk around the intersection because of her safety because people who were at the Kum N’ Go that was located at that store.

She says there’s no economic growth or development from this store, and there was 70 criminal offenses in 2019 at that location.

Chadd Harkrider addresses Council, pastor of South Side Baptist Church. He’s against the liquor license. He says he’s discovered drug needles and liquor bottles from their property. He even found a campsite on the church roof.

The President of the Neighborhood Alliance speaks to council and informs them the Alliance is against the measure. She is talking about how liquor stores are connected to violence and crime.

“Clearly this area experiences a higher than normal incidence of crime,” she said.

Councilman Schilling said he’s frequented the neighborhood often and that he agrees with the oppositions.

“I”m not concerned with creating an alcohol desert there,” Schilling said.

Measure fails unanimously.

14. EMERGENCY BILLS. Citizens May Speak. May Be Voted On.
15. Council Bill 2020-158 (McGull)
A Special Ordinance amending the budget of the Springfield-Greene County Health Department for Fiscal Year 2020-2021 in the amount of $2,184,000.00 to appropriate funds from the Public Health Fund balance to provide additional staff to respond to COVID-19; and declaring an emergency pursuant to City Charter Section 2.12.
Documents:

2020-158.PDF

This measure is to give more funds to the health department to hire 37 more contract tracers.

Springfield Greene County Health Department Director Clay Goddard addresses Council.

He responds to internet critics who always complain about not wearing masks when he talks to Council, and he explained it was done for citizens who are deaf and need to lip read, and he is socially distanced from everyone in the room.

Goddard said his department is waiting on CARES money from the County, and these dollars will help them get more contract employees to help the department, and allow people who normally do things like food safety inspections to get back to their main jobs on a more regular basis.

They believe the money will be made up when the county comes through with CARES Act funds.

Councilman Lear asked Goddard if this meets their need. Goddard says yes.

Bill passes 9-0.

And here we go…

16. Council Bill 2020-159 (Council)
A General Ordinance amending the Springfield City Code, Chapter 58, ‘Health and Sanitation,’ by adding a new Article XIII, ‘COVID-19 pandemic,’ to add regulations related to Face Coverings, occupancy limits, and physical distancing to respond to the COVID-19 pandemic; and declaring an emergency pursuant to City Charter Section 2.12.
Documents:

2020-159.PDF

Clay Goddard said the County set a new record for one day cases today with 49 new cases; a total of 553 confirmed cases have now been recorded. 594 are actively being monitored because of close contact with a positive case.

“We still have people who are going out in public when they are sick,” Goddard said. He said people coming together in close contact for long periods of time is spreading the disease and causing community spread.

“Masking is not a silver bullet,” Goddard said. “People need to physically distance, wash your hands on a regular basis, and stay home if you are sick or think you are sick.”

Dr. Robin Trotman, an infectious disease expert with CoxHealth, addresses Council.

“Right now our healthcare systems are stable,” Trotman said. “We’re stressed, but we’re not overwhelmed.”

He said hospital surrounding the area are overwhelmed, and they’re sending patients to Springfield.

He said that current treatments are working well, and keeping people off ventilators that would have likely needed them a few months ago.

“This virus has taxed our public health,” Trotman said.

Trotman said the concern is the spread when a patient is asymptomatic. They don’t transmit as much as someone showing symptoms, but they “do transmit the disease at a high rate.”

He said that there is damage not captured in deaths, including long term health conditions.

The report of what happened at Great Clips is going to be published in the CDC’s official publication tomorrow.

“It shows masks were likely what prevented spread,” Trotman said.

Councilman McGull asked about carbon dioxide accumulating in the blood stream. Dr. Trotman said that there is no accumulation with the masks most people will wear if correctly worn.

Trotman said the cell infected by COVID-19 is found all the way from the nose to the lungs. Unlike SARS, it can transmit without a cough because of where the virus is located.

Councilman Hosmer brought up community members who say the disease isn’t bad because there is only 9 deaths. He asked Trotman to clarify if that’s because of the availability of treatment.

Trotman said the bug and the host determine the death rate. He said a young healthy host can fight off the virus, but older folks can’t fight it off. He said that not having to use respirators is helping keep the fatality rate. He said the age of the infected right now is helping to lower the death rate.

Trotman said as we reach maximum capacity, the drugs and plasma will run out.

Mercy’s Craig McCoy addresses council and talks about how seat belt laws came about and the difference it made in saving lives.

“What’s popular isn’t always right, what’s right isn’t always popular,” McCoy said.

Mayor McClure adds an amendment that performers or speakers at events to remove a mask if they are social distanced from those in attendance.

The amendment passes unanimously.

Councilman Hosmer brings an amendment. That all providers of weddings must provide face covers, but the bridal party does not have to wear them during the ceremony or while photos are taken.

The amendment passes unanimously.

Ryan Baker addresses Council. He is talking about economic issues in the USA the last three years, prior to the pandemic.

“If someone wants to commit a crime [because of masks] they can do so more easily.”

Dr. Jim Blaine addresses Council. He is “independent” and not part of a health care system. He is in favor of masking. He cites the Great Clips situation as proving mask effectiveness.

Marina Belonozhko addresses Council and she is against the measure.

Brandon Bates addresses Council. He is against the measure. He claims he’s a veteran who was almost assaulted because he refused to wear a mask when told to at his school.

Tiffany Bull addresses Council. She’s against the measure. She is a sexual assault victim who was suffocated by her attacker, and it causes her to have PTSD related issues. She is asking the Council to take victims like her under consideration in this measure.

(Editor’s note: We had a letter to the editor from a sexual assault survivor on this issue earlier this week:

Joey Borevetica addresses Council and is in favor of the measure.

Dave Choate addresses Council and is against the measure.

Charles Church addresses Council. He is against the measure.

Ashley Colliver addresses Council. She is against the measure.

A gentleman addresses Council against the measure because of the limits on the number of people who are allowed to be inside the building. He said the Council’s restrictions will bankrupt local businesses that barely survived the first lockdown.

Ashley Clair addresses Council. She is in favor of masking. She spoke about dealing with her pregnancy during the lockdown. She said that people who refuse to wear masks or use social distancing is putting pregnant women at risk, as the CDC has listed pregnant women on the “high risk” list.

Glen Cunningham addresses Council. He is against it. He asks if the Council is going to buy masks for people who can’t afford it.

A man addresses Council. He is against the measure.

A man addresses Council. He is in favor of masks.

Neil DeWoody addresses Council. He is in favor of it. He is a nurse who works in infectious prevention.

“If we tell someone they need a new heart, they allow us to cut open their chest and put in a new heart. If we tell someone they have cancer, they allow us to put poison, literal poison, in their bloodstream to kill the cancer….” and then he points out how people scream they’re evil if they tell someone to wear a mask to stop a virus.

Kim Dahl addresses Council. She is against the measure.

Dr. Doug Duncan addresses Council. He is in favor of the measure, and says the ordinance is based on science.

Cindy Edwards addresses Council. She is a medical worker in the field of infectious disease and is in favor of the measure. She mentions that PPE is needed for other diseases such as MRSA and that COVID-19 can take the PPE away that will increase other serious diseases, called a healthcare acquired infection.

Anna Weiner addresses Council. She is in favor of the measure.

Emily Sanders addresses Council. She is in favor of the measure.

A man addresses Council and is against the measure.

Chris Gates addresses Council. He is in favor of the measure.

Steve Gibbons addresses Council. He is against the measure. He asks if the measure is passed to change expiration to 30 days, and then review the information then, similar to what was done with other steps in the Road to Recovery plan.

Ron Jencks speaks to Council. He is against the measure.

A man addresses Council. He is against the measure.

A woman, a doctor, addresses Council in favor of the measure. She is wearing a blood O2 monitor to show wearing a mask has no effect.

Lisa Meeks addresses Council. She is against the measure.

The Mayor calls a recess at 9:07 until 9:25.

The city had to restart the video.

City Council Meeting: City Council meets every other Monday at 6:30 pm in Historic City Hall, Springfield MO.

Posted by City of Springfield, MO – Connect with SGF on Monday, July 13, 2020

The head of the stroke center at Cox addresses Council and is in favor.

Calvin Morrow addresses Council. He is against the measure.

Marty Miller addresses Council. She is in favor of masks. She is a medical worker who went to New York in the initial days of the outbreak and said the Ozarks have not seen the worst of COVID-19.

Rev. Christopher Miller of Trinity Presbyterian Church addresses Council. He is in favor of the measure.

A man addresses Council who is against the measure.

Emily Poppa addresses Council. She is against the measure.

Seven Nelson addresses Council. She is talking about how it impacts people of color.

A doctor addresses Council and is in favor.

Megan Rollins addresses Council. She is not against the measure as a whole, but wants changes related to the wedding industry. She is claiming the new measure is unnecessarily hard on wedding businesses.

Lennon Rohoff addresses Council. He is against the measure.

A man addresses Council. He’s against the measure.

Chris Roberts addresses Council. He is in favor of the measure.

Adam Williamson addresses Council. He is against the measure and another wedding industry staffer.

Cody Simpson addresses Council. He is against the measure.

Larry Taylor addresses Council. He’s against the measure. “When you take advice from the medical community, you’re only getting one side of the story.” “You’re assuming that one side is telling the truth.”

A woman addresses Council. She is against the measure.

Curt Theobold addresses Council. He is against the measure and wants a delay.

Kyle Theobold addresses Council. He is against the measure.

Nathan Toomes addresses Council. He is against the measure.

Brendan Tull address Council. He is against the measure.

Rob Tull addresses Council. He is against the measure.

Sarah Waddle addresses Council. She is against the measure.

Mark Struckhoff addresses Council. He is in favor of the measure.

Mona Wagner addresses Council. She is against the measure.

Jamie Ward addresses Council. She is against the measure.

Amy Sutton addresses Council. She is in “strong” favor of the measure. She is addressing the issue of schools and the need to open them in the fall. She said that she’s uncomfortable right now sending her kids back, and she wants to see steps to mitigate the virus so it’s safer to go to school.

Tyler Willhite addresses Council. He is against the measure.

Dawn Williams addresses Council. She is against the measure and another wedding vendor.

Kyle Wyatt addresses Council. He is against the measure.

A man addresses Council and is against the measure.

Wendy Rodriguez addresses Council. She is against the measure.

Joy Young addresses Council. She is against the measure.

Councilmember Craig Hosmer asked Young what Constitutional requirement this ordinance violates, and she said it hinders her religious freedom.

Hosmer asked if they shouldn’t listen to doctors. “This is a public health crisis but we shouldn’t listen to medical professionals?”

“You should listen to the people who voted for you.”

City Clerk Cotter addressed various methods people commented.

8,592 forms from the website, 5,749 (66.9%) in favor.

3,287 voicemails. 1,423 (44%) in favor.

Public hearing is closed.

Councilman Simpson said comparing this ordinance to the holocaust is disgusting and has no place in this community. He says ignoring the needs of our neighbors won’t make the virus go away. “Decency matters.”

“We had people claim a silent majority, but we received 12,000 calls and notes from people who are in favor of this measure,” Simpson said.

He pointed out Cox, Mercy, and the Greene County Medical Society all strongly endorsed the measure.

He is voting yes.

Councilman Ollis asked if the proposed ordinance hits private offices.

Clay Goddard said “it is for places of public accommodation, so a private office is not normally a place of public accommodation.”

Councilman Ollis said this keeps the economy open and will vote in favor.

Councilman Hosmer slammed the holocaust comments. Hosmer pointed out that in 1905 the Supreme Court said communities could take action to protect itself against an epidemic of disease.

“We’ve been told we shouldn’t listen to doctors,” Hosmer said. “That they lie or don’t tell the truth. In a crisis, we should be out of office if we don’t listen to doctors. They’re the experts.”

Councilman Lear thanked Simpson for his words and agreed with him.

“Someone said this was done in a vacuum, and that is not true,” Lear said. “The business community understands this is the least intrusive way to go forward.”

Councilman McGull thanked the public for their response.

“We should all be proud of the process that took place here,” McGull said. “The first amendment was clearly represented here.”

“A legitimate government interest is not against the Constitution,” McGull said. “We have to listen to science. We have to listen to the statistics that say face coverings work. At the same time we have to listen to each other. We have to care for each other.”

Councilwoman Fisk noted she was threatened by detractors that they would picket the businesses of Council members if they vote for masks. She said a majority of citizens have said they want this measure. She noted the medical community has advocated for it.

Councilman Schilling said he’s in line with medical professionals. He notes that they’re in line with two priorities of Council: economic vitality and quality of place. He feels this measure promotes both.

Councilwoman Ferguson says she’s recusing herself from the vote because of potential conflicts of interest.

Measure passes 8-0. Ferguson abstains.

“A united Council has spoken,” McClure said. “We never wished to have to do something like this. However, the data, and our lived experience over the last four months has made it crystal clear this is the right step to take against the coronavirus.”

“This is not a time for social disobedience,” McClure said. “The community needs to step up to help the numbers or at least not make them worse.”

The mayor put the meeting into recess until 11:50.

18. GRANTS. Citizens May Speak. May Be Voted On.
19. Council Bill 2020-160 (Simpson)
A Special Ordinance authorizing the City Manager, or his designee, to apply for and accept a grant in the amount of $300,000, from the Environmental Protection Agency for the purpose of providing supplemental funds to the City’s Brownfields Revolving Loan Fund Program and to enter into contracts to carry out the grant objectives; and amending the budget provided for the Planning and Development Department for Fiscal Year 2020-2021 in the amount of $300,000.
Documents:

2020-160.PDF

Passes 9-0.

22. Council Bill 2020-161 (McGull)
A Special Ordinance approving a Petition to Establish the Glenstone and Kearney Community Improvement District; declaring the 4.54 acres in said District to be a blighted area and its redevelopment necessary for the preservation of the public peace, prosperity, health, safety, morals, and welfare; authorizing the City Manager to execute a Cooperative Agreement between the City, the Glenstone and Kearney Community Improvement District, and Missouri Commercial Development, LLC; and directing the City Clerk to notify the Missouri Department of Economic Development of the creation of the District. (Staff recommends approval.)
Documents:

2020-161.PDF

This is being called a “blighted CID” as part of the Kearney Street corridor and would have a 30 year life.

Public hearing closed. Vote in two weeks.

23. Council Bill 2020-162 (Ferguson)
A Special Ordinance approving a Petition to Establish the Kay Pointe Place Community Improvement District; authorizing the City Manager to execute a Cooperative Agreement between the City and the Kay Pointe Place Community Improvement District, and Carleton Resources, LLC; and directing the City Clerk to notify the Missouri Department of Economic Development of the creation of the District. (Staff recommends approval.)
Documents:

2020-162.PDF

Public hearing closed. Vote in two weeks.

24. Council Bill 2020-163 (Schilling)
A Special Ordinance approving a Petition to Establish the Ridge at Ward Farm Community Improvement District; authorizing the City Manager to execute a Cooperative Agreement between the City, the Ridge at Ward Farm Community Improvement District, and RW Developments, LLC; and directing the City Clerk to notify the Missouri Department of Economic Development of the creation of the District. (Staff recommends approval.)
Documents:

2020-163.PDF

25. FIRST READING BILLS. Citizens May Speak. Not Anticipated To Be Voted On.
26. Council Bill 2020-164 (Ferguson)
A Special Ordinance approving the plans and specifications for the Commercial Street Parking Lot and Pedestrian Alleyway Improvement Project; accepting the bid of Hunter Chase & Associates, Inc., in the amount of $522,660.40, for the project; and authorizing the City Manager, or his designee, to enter into a contract with such bidder.
Documents:
2020-164.PDF

27. Council Bill 2020-165 (Ferguson)
A Special Ordinance authorizing the City Manager, or his designee, to accept a donation of mosaic artwork valued at $15,000.00 from the Commercial Club of Springfield, Missouri, for inclusion in sidewalk construction and enhancement in the Commercial Street area.
Documents

2020-165.PDF

Public hearing closed. Vote in two weeks.

28. Council Bill 2020-166 (Ferguson)
A Special Ordinance authorizing expenditures from the Commercial Street Tax Increment Financing Special Allocation Fund for public improvement projects within the Commercial Street Tax Increment Financing District in the amount of $66,000, which had previously been allocated for the Commercial Street TIF Façade Loan Program. (Staff recommends approval.)
Documents:

2020-166.PDF

Public hearing closed. Vote in two weeks.

29. Council Bill 2020-167 (Ollis)
A Special Ordinance amending the Fiscal Year 2019-2020 operating budget of the City of Springfield by increasing both revenue and expenses in the amount of $368,028.00, in various Special Revenue and Capital Project Funds, for the purpose of accounting for certain reimbursements and associated offsetting expenses.
Documents:
2020-167.PDF

30. Council Bill 2020-168 (Hosmer)
A Special Ordinance amending the Fiscal Year 2019-2020 operating budget of the City of Springfield in the General Fund by increasing both revenue and expenses in the amount of $146,511.00, for the purpose of adjusting for certain reimbursements and associated offsetting expenses as well as adjusting the salary budget for retirement payouts.
Documents:

2020-168.PDF

Public hearing closed. Vote in two weeks.

31. Council Bill 2020-169 (McClure)
A Special Ordinance authorizing the General Manager of City Utilities of Springfield, Missouri (“City Utilities”), or his designee, on behalf of City Utilities to enter into an agreement with BKD, LLP, to provide professional auditing services to City Utilities for Fiscal Years 2020-2024. If City Utilities is unsuccessful at negotiating the terms and conditions of such a contract with BKD, LLP, then City Utilities will move to do so with RSM US, LLP.
Documents:

2020-169.PDF Public hearing closed. Vote in two weeks.

38. Council Bill 2020-171 (Simpson)
A Special Ordinance authorizing the City Manager, or his designee, to accept a donation of 700 railroad ties, valued at $17,780.00, from BSB Tie Company to be used by the Springfield Police Department to improve safety in their training shoot house.
Documents:

2020-171.PDF

Tim Havens addresses Council. He said he didn’t know what it was and so he wanted it off the consent agenda.

Public hearing closed. Vote in two weeks.

32. PETITIONS, REMONSTRANCES AND COMMUNICATIONS.

Holly Echaria addresses Council.

She is talking about pothole funds being used for body cameras for police.

The Vice President of the NAACP addresses Council. She is claiming the police department isn’t following procedures because she claims there are disparities in traffic stops.

Toni Robinson addresses Council. She is NAACP President. She is making the same claims as her Vice President.

Cheryl Clay addresses Council. She is former President of NAACP. She is talking about the police civilian review board and is making claims about the police department.

Mayor McClure asked if they talked to Chief Williams, and Clay said no, and McClure says she needs to start with them.

Thomas Haines addresses Council. He is telling a story about a traffic stop where he’s claiming racial issues took place.

Mia Jones addresses Council. Founder of United Community Change organization. She is advocating unity among all parts of the community, and then is calling for police officers to have individual liability insurance, business cards with vital information, and make other changes to the department.

Kimberly Woodman addresses Council. She is addressing the same items as previous speakers.

Tim Havens addresses Council. He is claiming the police department is not being monitored.

Council adjourns 8-1, with Hosmer, even tonight, voting no.

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