Springfield City Council LIVE November 4, 2019

It’s looking like a long Springfield City Council meeting tonight because of potential changes to the city’s building codes. Environmentalists on the left side of the room, builders on the right, with the media stuck in the middle reporting to you.

City Council Meeting: City Council meets every other Monday at 6:30 pm in Historic City Hall, Springfield MO.

Posted by City of Springfield, MO – Connect with SGF on Monday, November 4, 2019

Mayor McClure calls the meeting to order at 6:31 p.m..

1. ROLL CALL.
2.APPROVAL OF MINUTES. October 21, 20919 City Council Meeting And October 29, 2019 Special City Council Meeting.
Documents:

  1. 10-21-19.PDF
  2. 10-29-19 SPECIAL CITY COUNCIL MEETING.PDF

Approved 9-0.

3. FINALIZATION AND APPROVAL OF CONSENT AGENDAS. CITIZENS WISHING TO SPEAK TO OR REMOVE ITEMS FROM THE CONSENT AGENDAS MUST DO SO AT THIS TIME.

Passes 9-0.


4. CEREMONIAL MATTERS.
5. CITY MANAGER REPORT AND RESPONSES TO QUESTIONS RAISED AT THE PREVIOUS CITY COUNCIL MEETINGS.

Quarterly public safety reports from police and fire given to council.

7. Council Bill 2019-219. (McGull) Tabled At The October 7, 2019 City Council Meeting.
A special ordinance declaring the necessity of condemning construction and permanent easements over, under, and through the following properties generally located near 340 South Patterson Avenue and west of East Horning Street, south of Elmwood Avenue in the City of Springfield, Missouri; and authorizing certain officers, or their designees, to do all things necessary to carry out the terms of this Ordinance for the purpose of completing the Beechwood Heights Storm Water Project-Phase I: East Walnut Street Project #2015PW0091WTE funded through the ¼-Cent Capital Improvement Sales Tax.
Documents:2019-219.PDF

Councilman McGull said the groups tried to work together but haven’t resolved their issues; he said they can continue to negotiate but it’s time for Council to act.

Passes 9-0.

8. Council Bill 2019-239. (Schilling)
A special ordinance approving a Redevelopment Plan submitted by the STL 505 Redevelopment Corporation for the redevelopment of an area generally located at 501 through 517 East Saint Louis Street; declaring the area in such plan to be a blighted area and its redevelopment necessary for the preservation of the public peace, prosperity, health, safety, morals, and welfare; authorizing certain tax abatement within the plan area; and authorizing the City Manager to execute an agreement with the Redevelopment Corporation relating to the implementation of the Redevelopment Plan. (Staff recommends approval.)
Documents:2019-239.PDF

Schilling asked staff about payment in lieu of taxes and total amount of abatement over time. He also asked about lack of parking for the development.

Staff showed that without development, the city would make about $185,000 in taxes, with abatement and development $1.25 million.

Staff said the development has worked out a deal with a nearby church to allow their residents to park at their facility.

A representative of the developer confirmed the agreement and that they would be working with partners around them to provide additional parking. He noted their current plan offers more parking than other downtown developments.

Councilwoman Ferguson asked if the deal with the church was 24/7, even during services, and the developer confirmed it is a 24/7 deal.

Councilman Hosmer asked if the vote locks in the parking and the developer confirms they have the spaces. Staff noted that parking is not part of the redevelopment agreement, so the deal can’t be terminated because of lack of parking.

Councilman Ollis notes the lot where the project is taking place has been overgrown and blighted for years; staff estimated it was blighted for about 20 years.

Councilman Hosmer says he will be moving against the measure, indicating that he backed the other apartment owners who are against this development taking place.

Passes 8-1 with Hosmer the lone no vote.

9. Council Bill 2019-240. (Ollis)
A special ordinance authorizing the City Manager, or his designee, to enter into an agreement with Traffic Technology Services, Inc., for the purpose of sharing the City’s real time traffic management data to provide traffic signal information to vehicle manufacturers for ”Connected Vehicle” applications.
Documents: 2019-240.PDF

Passes 9-0.

10. Council Bill 2019-242. (Hosmer)
A special ordinance authorizing the City Manager, to enter into an Intergovernmental Agreement with the Federal Bureau of Investigation for the Springfield Police Department to participate in the Career Criminal Task Force; and amending the budget of the Police Department for Fiscal Year 2019-2020 in the amount of $74,596.00.
Documents: 2019-242.PDF

Passes 9-0.

11. RESOLUTIONS. Citizens May Speak. May Be Voted On.
12. Council Bill 2019-243. (McClure)
A resolution adopting the City of Springfield’s Legislative Priorities for 2020.
Documents: 2019-243.PDF

City manager Jason Gage reviewed the bill for Council, noting they were first brought up two weeks ago at Council lunch and changes made per Councilmember notes.

(These were highlighted in our preview of tonight’s meeting.)

Public hearing closed without public comment.

Councilman Lear addresses the measure regarding diversity. He said that he was going to ask the Missouri Non Discrimination Act to be included but he “doesn’t feel it will get a fair hearing” in the legislature and won’t push to add it.

Passes 9-0.

13. Council Bill 2019-244. (McClure)
A resolution authorizing Councilman Richard Ollis to participate in a mobility study tour hosted by LaneShift, LLC, in New York City from March 10, 2020, through March 13, 2020.
Documents: 2019-244.PDF

Ollis will learn about issues like bike friendly real estate development.

Councilwoman Ferguson asked if there were funds in the budget. Staff said they were not sure. City manager Jason Gage said he can find funds in the budget if something of this nature is important to Council members.

Ferguson replied that she’s been told there’s very little funding for travel budget for Council.

Ollis recuses himself from the debate.

McGull jokes they can take the cost from Ollis’ salary.

Bill passes 8-0 with Ollis not voting.

19. FIRST READING BILLS. Citizens May Speak. Not Anticipated To Be Voted On.
20. Council Bill 2019-245. (Fisk)
A special ordinance authorizing the City Manager, or his designee, to accept grant funds from the Springfield Police Foundation totaling $75,628.86, to fund the purchase of Photogrammetry/Mapping Software for the Traffic Section Drone, Rifle Rated Ballistic Shields, a K9 Camera System, a Long-Range Acoustic Device, and Major Crime Investigator Camera Packages; and amending the budget for the Police Department for Fiscal Year 2019-2020 in the amount of $75,628.86.
Documents:

  1. 2019-245.PDF

Chief Williams said that all of their requests to the companies involved have been met.

James Radke address Council.

He’s objecting to the bill because there are not body cameras for officers.

“Anything that militarizes our police I’m opposed to,” he said.

Public hearing closed. Vote in two weeks.

21. Council Bill 2019-246. (Schilling)
A special ordinance authorizing the City Manager, or his designee, to accept a grant in the amount of $10,000.00, from Community Partnership of the Ozarks for reimbursement of expenses incurred by the Springfield Police Department for participating in the Mental Health First Aid Program and amending the budget for the Police Department for Fiscal Year 2019-2020 in the amount of $10,000.00.
Documents: 2019-246.PDF

This is to reimburse the time spent by officers selected to train citizens at no cost.

Public hearing closed. Vote in two weeks.

22. Council Bill 2019-247. (Simpson)
A special ordinance authorizing the City Manager to enter into a contract with BKD, LLP, for the purpose of providing internal audit services for one year at a cost of $77,586, with the option of up to four additional one-year terms.
Documents: 2019-247.PDF

City staff solicited bids and received 5 proposals, bringing the top 3 to the finance administration committee and evaluation committee. BKD was the lowest and best option to meet required services.

Public hearing closed. Vote in two weeks.

NEXT IS THE CHANGES TO THE CITY’S LAND DEVELOPMENT CODE. THE MAYOR IS HAVING ALL OF THE MEASURES READ TOGETHER.

23. Council Bill 2019-248. (Ollis, Lear, And McGull)
A general ordinance amending Article I. – ‘Administration and Enforcement of Codes’ of Chapter 36 of the Springfield City Code, known as the ‘Land Development Code.’ (Recommended by Plans and Policies Committee.)
Documents:
2019-248.PDF

24. Council Bill 2019-249. (Ollis, Lear, And McGull)
A general ordinance amending the City of Springfield Land Development Code, Article IV, ‘Building Trades, Appeals, and Licensing,’ to clarify existing language, delete unnecessary language, and amend certain language by repealing Article IV in its entirety, and enacting in lieu thereof a new Article IV, ‘Building Trades Examination and Certification Board.’ (Recommended by Plans and Policies Committee.)
Documents:
2019-249.PDF

25. Council Bill 2019-250. (Ollis, Lear, And McGull)
A general ordinance amending Chapter 36 of the Springfield City Code, known as the Land Development Code, by repealing Article V, ‘Building Code,’ in its entirety, and enacting in lieu thereof a new Article V, ‘Building Code.’ (Recommended by Plans and Policies Committee.)
Documents:
2019-250.PDF

26. Council Bill 2019-251. (Ollis, Lear, And McGull)
A general ordinance amending Chapter 36 of the Springfield City Code, known as the ‘Land Development Code,’ by repealing Article VI, ‘Electrical Code,’ in its entirety, and enacting in lieu thereof a new Article VI, ‘Electrical Code.’ (Recommended by Plans and Policies Committee.)
Documents:
2019-251.PDF

27. Council Bill 2019-252. (Ollis, Lear, And McGull)
A general ordinance amending Chapter 36 of the Springfield City Code, known as the ‘Land Development Code,’ by repealing Article VII, ‘International Property Maintenance Code,’ in its entirety, and enacting a new Article VII, ‘International Property Maintenance Code.’ (Recommended by Plans and Policies Committee.)
Documents:
2019-252.PDF

28. Council Bill 2019-253. (Ollis, Lear, And McGull)
A general ordinance amending Chapter 36 of the Springfield City Code, known as the ‘Land Development Code,’ by repealing Article VIII, ‘Plumbing Code,’ in its entirety, and enacting in lieu thereof a new Article VIII, ‘Plumbing Code.’ (Recommended by Plans and Policies Committee.)
Documents:
2019-253.PDF

29. Council Bill 2019-254. (Ollis, Lear, And McGull)
A general ordinance amending Chapter 36 of the Springfield City Code, known as the ‘Land Development Code,’ by repealing Article IX, ‘Mechanical Code,’ in its entirety, and enacting in lieu thereof a new Article IX, ‘Mechanical Code.’ (Recommended by Plans and Policies Committee.)
Documents:
2019-254.PDF

30. Council Bill 2019-255. (Ollis, Lear, And McGull)
A general ordinance amending Chapter 36 of the Springfield City Code, known as the ‘Land Development Code,’ by repealing Article XIV, ‘Fuel Gas Code,’ in its entirety, and enacting in lieu thereof a new Article XIV, ‘Fuel Gas Code.’ (Recommended by Plans and Policies Committee.)
Documents:
2019-255.PDF

31. Council Bill 2019-256. (Ollis, Lear, And McGull)
A general ordinance amending Chapter 36 of the Springfield City Code, known as the ‘Land Development Code,’ by repealing Article XV, ‘Private Sewage Disposal Code,’ in its entirety, and enacting in lieu thereof a new Article XV, ‘Private Sewage Disposal Code.’ (Recommended by Plans and Policies Committee.)
Documents:
2019-256.PDF

32. Council Bill 2019-257. (Ollis, Lear, And McGull)
A general ordinance amending Chapter 36 of the Springfield City Code, known as the Land Development Code, by repealing Article XVI, ‘Existing Building Code,’ in its entirety, and enacting in lieu thereof a new Article XVI, ‘Existing Building Code.’ (Recommended by Plans and Policies Committee.)
Documents:
2019-257.PDF

33. Council Bill 2019-258. (Ollis, Lear, And McGull)
A general ordinance adopting the 2018 Swimming Pool and Spa Code as Article XVIII of Chapter 36 of the Springfield City Code, known as the ‘Land Development Code.’ (Recommended by Plans and Policies Committee.)
Documents:
2019-258.PDF

Director of Building Development Services Harlan Hill addresses Council.

Changed renewal from 12 months to 6, meaning it will come up June 30 rather than December 31.

Stephanie Stenger addresses Council. She is a local developer. She thanked Richard Ollis for bringing “everyone to the table.” She noted there was no way everyone could be happy but she appreciated being able to give input.

Public hearing closed. Vote in two weeks.

34. Council Bill 2019-259. (Ollis, Lear, Hosmer, And McGull)
A general ordinance adopting the 2012 International Energy Conservation Code as Article XIX of Chapter 36 of the Springfield City Code, known as the Land Development Code; declaring the intent of the currently constituted City Council to adopt the 2018 or 2021 International Energy Conservation Code to take effect on January 1, 2023; and instructing City staff to solicit input from stakeholders about whether minor amendments to the 2018 or 2021 Code should be adopted prior to such Code’s adoption and to present a report regarding the input and staff’s recommendations to City Council. (Recommended by Plans and Policies Committee.)
Documents: 2019-259.PDF

Richard Quint addresses Council. He says he’s a contractor who’s been involved in hundreds of millions of dollars of development.

He said adoption of the code would cause Springfield to lose builders and jobs to surrounding towns.

Megan Short addresses Council. She praises Councilman Ollis for his efforts bringing people together to talk about the code changes.

Public hearing closed. Vote in two weeks.

35. Council Bill 2019-260. (Ollis, Lear, And McGull)
A general ordinance amending Chapter 36, Article XIII of the Springfield City Code, known as the Land Development Code, by repealing Article XIII, ‘Residential Building Code,’ in its entirety, and enacting in lieu thereof a new Article XIII, ‘Residential Building Code,’ amending Chapter 36, Article XIII, Section 36-1302, ‘Deletions, modifications, amendments, and additions, Section N1102 (R402) ‘Building Thermal Envelope,’ by repealing said section in its entirety and enacting in lieu thereof a new Section N1102 to take effect on July 1, 2021; declaring the intent of the currently constituted City Council to adopt the 2018 or 2021 International Residential Building Code to become effective on January 1, 2022; and instructing City staff to solicit input from stakeholders about whether minor amendments to the 2018 or 2021 Code should be adopted prior to such Code’s adoption and to present a report regarding the input and staff’s recommendations to City Council. (Recommended by Plans and Policies Committee.)
Documents:2019-260.PDF

Councilman Hosmer asked Harlan Hill of Building Development Services to go through the new code.

Councilman Hosmer is grilling Hill regarding the proposals and if he supports the measure. He said he has proposed a “progressive” plan that will allow for further implementation of more policies later.

Hosmer asked if any homeowners showed up at committee meetings, and Mayor McClure interrupted to inform Mr. Hosmer that hearing from the public is the reason for the public hearing they’re currently holding.

Hill says the variables in a building are so different from home to home that you have to look at the projects individually. One change, such as changing the number of windows, produces a different result of evaluations.

Hosmer is repeatedly bringing up utility costs.

Now Hosmer is asking about air exchange testing in the city.

HBA President Jason Bekebrede supports the codes without amendments, but wishes the time frame was longer than 3 years. He’s built homes in the city to the 2018 code.

Councilman Hosmer is again asking about blower door tests.

Hosmer is now claiming the proposal “will never get us to the 2018 or 2021 code.”

Louise Wienckowski of the Sierra Club White River Group, addresses council advocating for the 2018 codes. She is part of a group of Sierra Club members who will be addressing Council.

She’s now going on to climate change talking points about fossil fuel.

Rusty McLaughlin, local homebuilder and past president of local and state Homebuilders Association. Also on Habitat for Humanity board.

He mentions Vision 20/20 and that affordable homes being kept that way was a priority. He said today, a Habitat home under 2006 codes without a garage, is just about $106,000. He said people will be forced into permanent renter status and be unable to afford a home if the full code is implemented on builders.

“This is going to hurt the families who can least afford to be hurt,” he said. He said increasing the cost of a home doesn’t help those who need it most.

Counselman Hosmer is bringing up utility bills.

McLaughlin mentions renovations and remodels because there are a lot of homes “in bad shape.” He said they came to a meeting showing renovations to the 2006 energy code showing the utility bills at around $200 a month, after renovations, it was in the $90 a month range. Under 2018 code, he says that such a decrease can’t be done.

He said that St. Louis included remodeling under the 2018 energy code and they have over 7,000 abandoned homes and are looking at spending about four million a year to raze some of those buildings that are housing “criminal elements.”

The mayor’s called for a 15 minute recess.

One of the Sierra Club speakers mentioned that the international home builders associations have struck deals with the international code organization to have input on their codes, and noted that savings for families in terms of energy that it’s fallen to 1% and 2% in the last codes.

A speaker who says he’s not a contractor nor involved with an environmental activist group is asking the Council to consider how the codes are driving affordable housing away. He said a lot of affordable housing went to Nixa and Ozark, and now goes to places like Spokane, where people commute and that doesn’t save energy costs.

A Missouri State student is telling Council about having to work a job six days a week while attending school with an internship because of her utility bills. She is speaking climate change talking points as well.

A woman representing the NAACP is asking Council to vote down the amended code. She says that customers of color usually pay more for utilities. She says minorities and the poor will be disproportionately impacted by the codes.

A speaker is asking why the city doesn’t inspect for energy codes and says that would enhance the quality of homes. He said that Hal Higdon at OTC can implement a program quickly to train blower door technicians.

Public hearing closed, vote in two weeks.

The Mayor thanked everyone who spoke on the matter.

36. Council Bill 2019-261. (Ollis, Lear, Hosmer, And McGull)
A special ordinance authorizing the City of Springfield, Missouri, to join the commercial component of the Show Me Property Assessment Clean Energy District created pursuant to Missouri Revised Statutes Sections 67.2800 to 67.2835, known as the “Property Assessment Clean Energy Act;” stating the City’s intent to participate in the commercial component of the “Property Assessed Clean Energy” Program as a member of such District; requesting appointment to the District’s Advisory Board; disclaiming any need for appropriation; and directing the City Clerk to send a certified copy of this Ordinance to the Board of Directors of the District. (Recommended by Plans and Policies Committee.)
Documents: 2019-261.PDF

This would make PACE loans available to commercial entities in Springfield.

The Council is showing concern for discrepancies in the information being provided to Council versus what they’re being told about the measure.

Public hearing closed. Vote in two weeks.

The Mayor noted that he did not open to public comment the vote on the Council bill that allowed Richard Ollis to attend a mobility conference. The vote on the council bill is reconsidered; opened for public hearing and then closed because there’s no speakers; passes again 8-0.

Meeting adjourned 8-1…Hosmer as usual voting no.

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